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ICRC operational security: staff safety in armed conflict and internal violence

Published:
1 June 2009
Region:
Global
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ICRC operational security: staff safety in armed conflict and internal violence

Acknowledging the increasingly dangerous nature of humanitarian action in conflict areas, Patrick Brugger describes the ICRC’s approach to security issues and its seven-pillared security policy. Underpinning the ICRC’s approach is the constant assessment of the risks involved in carrying out its mandate, and weighing these risks against every operation and its humanitarian impact. Consistent messaging, and understanding how the ICRC is perceived in various contexts, is also central: both the security of field staff, and the organisation’s ability to operate in complex environments, ‘depends on coherence between the mandate, principles and action’.

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