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Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) Investigation Guide

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Published:
12 May 2022
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Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) Investigation Guide

Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) Investigation Guide: Recommended Practice for the Humanitarian and Development Sector is the foundation of the SEAH Investigator Qualification Training Scheme (IQTS).

The guide explains the structured investigation processes necessary to professionally investigate Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Harassment (SEAH) incidents in the humanitarian and development sector. It provides best practice guidance, tools, and steps for conducting survivor-centered SEAH investigations.

The IQTS scheme is a collaborative effort between CHS Alliance, Humentum and the UK Government’s Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office to develop a training scheme to improve the quality of safeguarding investigations carried out by NGOs and international bodies.

The UK FCDO was pleased to fund this important initiative to drive up standards for investigating SEAH in humanitarian and development contexts.  It provides a practical, survivor-centred framework to build SEAH investigation capacity across the aid sector and one that should help bring perpetrators to account for their actions and support accountability to survivors.” Mary Thompson, Senior Social Development Adviser, UK FCDO.

Published in April 2022, it replaces previous guidance published by the CHS Alliance.

This project was funded with UK aid from the UK government.

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