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Summary Brief: Global Standards on Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Sexual Harassment

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Published:
19 January 2021
Region:
Global
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Summary Brief: Global Standards on Sexual Exploitation, Abuse and Sexual Harassment

This summary brief provides civil society organisations (CSOs) with an overview of the global standards on sexual exploitation, abuse and sexual harassment (SEAH). It provides a short summary of the five most relevant standards on SEAH. These are:

  • ILO Convention 190 on violence and harassment in the workplace;
  • Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC) Recommendation on Ending Sexual Exploitation, Abuse, and Harassment in Development Co-operation and Humanitarian Assistance;
  • Inter-Agency Standing Committee Minimum Operating Standards: Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by Own Personnel (MOS-PSEA);
  • Core Humanitarian Standard (CHS);
  • The International Child Safeguarding Standards by Keeping Children Safe.

The brief sets out the content of each of these standards, who they are relevant to and how they are applicable to CSOs. It also provides a question and answers section on how CSOs can adapt these standards to different contexts.

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